wireing the layout

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wireing the layout

Postby mike » 11 Apr 2010 20:11

Hi every one, as I have been out of the model scene for a good few years, and never wired up a large (or small) layout, I am now ready to start laying track on my project, my question is, how often do you recommend droppers from the track to a bus wire? I will be useing DCC control and the layout is approx: 8mtrs x 2.2 mtrs in a loop with a raised terminus station and loco yard, with an aditional goods/marshelling yard proposed at a later date, most of the track will be 900mm peco flexitrack with single-three way and double slip point work, any advice would be helpful. mike.
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby Flashbang » 11 Apr 2010 20:40

Hi
For the very best performance every piece of track is connected directly to the bus. This removes all reliance on the metal rail joiners (fishplates) passing track power and data rail to rail.
But at the end of the day, its really up to you.
Best wishes with your railway modelling.
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby mike » 11 Apr 2010 20:53

Thanks Flashbang, just wondered if the long flexi would need extra drops. mike.
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby peter » 12 Apr 2010 00:30

Not realy Mike , but after saying that i have read of some using two droppers on each :o A bit OTT but if you feel better if you do , it won't cause any trouble ;)
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby PetiePeterson » 22 Apr 2010 16:25

Hey not meaning to hijack you post, but kind of related :lol:

Not being a pure electrician, couple of questions:

1)What is the tidyest way to connect droppers to the bus?

2) What kind of wire is sufficiant for the droppers and for the bus?

I find i allways over-do the wire thickness to be safe and normally go for terminal blocks (through lazyness) and as im moving on to do a large layout would like to keep it simple and tidy!

Cheers,
Peter
modelrailways.co.uk Team
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby Flashbang » 22 Apr 2010 17:13

Hi
Best way of connecting the dropper wires to the bus wire is to solder them.
Alternatively, you can use terminal blocks 5Amp or 10/15Amp type Example of Terminal blocks
Or Snap Lock connectors, but these MUST be of the correct size for the bus wire. Example of Snap Lock

If you keep the dropper wires short (Not longer than 300mm - 12"inches) and you run one to each length of track then 7/0.2mm flexible wire will be ok. But for layouts where dropper wires will exceed 300mm in length or you're feeding every other length of track etc consider 16/0.2mm wire
Example 7/0.2mm
Example 16/0.2mm
Best wishes with your railway modelling.
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby PetiePeterson » 22 Apr 2010 22:04

Cheers flashbang, what are we looking at for bus wire? Take it the normal 240v 13A stuff is my overkill?
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Re: wireing the layout

Postby Flashbang » 23 Apr 2010 00:12

PetiePeterson wrote:Cheers flashbang, what are we looking at for bus wire? Take it the normal 240v 13A stuff is my overkill?

Hi
You can't "Overkill"! Bus wire size depends on....... The size of the layout. The number of locos to be moving including sound fitted ones plus a small amount of current needed for those stationary and with lights on and perhaps sounds on.

Small to medium layouts 1.5mm2 solid is perhaps ok while medium sized layouts need 2.5mm2 though this can equally be used on smaller layouts without problems
If you want flexible wire for the bus then 32/0.2mm or even 50/0.2mm would be ok.

Consider also splitting the layout up into electrical sections (Called zones) with Insulated Rail Joiners (IRJs) on each track entering and leaving the section, Then feed each zone via a sub bus fed from the main bus wires. I would recommend using a electronic circuit breaker (Such as the EB1) to protect the sub bus as this will trip before the main console under a fault in the zone and help to ensure only the problem section stops working while the rest of the layout remains operational. Also ideal to have the layout sections as its aids fault finding too!

You may find the DCC page of this web site helpful? Which details zones and bus feeding etc .. http://www.brian-lambert.co.uk/DCC.htm
Best wishes with your railway modelling.
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